Archive | February 2012

Inside Fukushima – in pictures

I’ve written several posts about TEPCO and what happened in the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami on March 11 last year. TEPCO recently let a group of journalists and photographers into the Fukushima nuclear plant where three reactors suffered meltdown after the earthquake. The communication strategy behind this is worth a post in itself, but in the meantime the Guardian has posted a slideshow of fascinating pictures from the visit.

Inside Fukushima–in pictures

More on Blankfein and Same-Sex Marriage

English: Logo of The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc....

Knowledge @ Wharton wrote a follow-up post to the New York Times article I was quoted in regarding Blankfein’s new role as spokesman for same-sex marriage. Some excerpts are below and you can find the full article here

“I’m Lloyd Blankfein … and I support marriage equality.” Those are the words used by the chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs in a new video spot produced by The Human Rights Campaign, a national organization that advocates equal rights for gays, lesbians, bisexuals and transgendered people.

Blankfein is not the most obvious spokesperson for such a campaign. As an article in The New York Times points out, he has been “a lightning rod for Wall Street critics” taking aim at exorbitant executive pay packages and the role Goldman Sachs and other investment banks played leading up to the financial crisis.

Read More…

Komen leader’s latest apology about Planned Parenthood fiasco goes only halfway

Supporters of Planned Parenthood

 of the Washington Post’s On Leadership section posted about Nancy Brinker, founder and CEO of Susan G. Komen for the Cure’s half-hearted apology about the Planned Parenthood de-funding. I couldn’t agree more with Jena’s assessment of the apology using my framework. I’ve posted it below and  you can see the original article here.

In the world of crisis communications, what has the potential to be more damaging than not issuing an apology? An apology that reads like only half of one.

Nancy Brinker’s response to Sally Quinn’s open letter to the Susan G. Komen for the Cure founder and CEO includes an admission that she made mistakes and an apology to those who were disappointed by the nonprofit’s decision to pull its funding to Planned Parenthood. (Komenlater said Planned Parenthood could reapply for funding.) Brinker says she has learned a lot, including that “that we in women’s health organizations must be absolutely true to our core missions, and avoid even the appearance of bias or judgment in our decisions.”

But what she does not say is more telling. Brinker does not say exactly what she is sorry for. She does not explore what mistakes she made. And she does not address several of the points in Quinn’s letter, from the ambiguity of Komen’s decision to allow Planned Parenthood to reapply—though not necessarily be funded—to why her institution’sshifting explanations for its controversial move were so confusing. It’s also interesting that it seems to have taken criticism from Sally Quinn (who describes herself as a longtime friend of Brinker’s in Washington), more so than the outrage of millions of citizens, to elicit such an admission. Read More…

Blankfein to Speak Out for Same-Sex Marriage

The New York Times Dealbook recently asked me to comment on Goldman Sachs CEO Blankfein’s decision to speak out for same-sex marriage. I have posted some excerpts including my quote below, and you can read the full article in New York Times’ Dealbook here

Lloyd C. Blankfein, the chief of Goldman Sachs who has become a lightning rod for Wall Street critics, might seem an unlikely advocate for same-sex marriage. But his credentials — a public figure in a conservative industry — could make him a powerful voice for that cause.

The Human Rights Campaign, a national organization that promotes equal rights for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people, has persuaded Mr. Blankfein to be its first national corporate spokesman for same-sex marriage, an issue that will come up for a legislative vote in several states this year, including Washington and Maryland. Fred Sainz, an executive with the Human Rights Campaign, said the organization sought Mr. Blankfein, in part, because he is “an unexpected messenger.”

Paul A. Argenti, a professor of corporate communication at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth, says Mr. Blankfein’s decision isn’t likely to have any positive impact on the reputation of the firm — or Mr. Blankfein.

“If you are a Goldman employee and you are gay or contemplating coming out, this is great,” he said. But for Goldman and Mr. Blankfein, the issue of same-sex marriage has nothing to do with what Goldman Sachs does. “If Mr. Blankfein was taking a radical stand on pay you could say wow, that’s big. But equality is simply not an issue you associate with Goldman.”

Still, the campaign is sure to turn heads on Wall Street, which despite having made progress on equality issues over the last decade, is still considered to be a male-dominated, testosterone-driven place.

…Read the rest of the article here.

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